Oakley – The Fusion of Science, Art & Expanding the Brand

Oakley, Inc. has long since been one of the leading sports brands dedicated to the fusion of science and art through its innovation in their products. Because of its huge success, it comes as no surprise that Oakley, Inc. would expand into the creation of other brands. These brands are the leading ones that you would find in the company's company portfolio:

Dragon – This brand actually has its roots dating back to 1993 in Southern California, with primary focus on the youth and its culture. Its influences come from the street and music culture rampant in today's youth, which are heavily accentuated into the products and eyewear the brand is very famous for. In fact, when you look at the goggles, sunglasses, and other accessories distributed by Dragon, you can certainly get in touch with the lifestyle and preferences of today's youth. At present, Dragon's products are distributed in over 45 countries worldwide, with a vast number of core retailers to its name.

Eye Safety Systems (ESS) – The designs developed by ESS are very popular, especially in the ranks of the military, police officers, and firefighters. This is because the designs boast of advanced eye protection systems of the optimum level. Such quality has made ESS the leading brand and supplier of eyewear for the US military. The great thing about ESS designs is that these were conceptualized for the most hostile environment possible, so peak performance and eye safety are guaranteed by these products.

Fox Racing, Inc. – The typical apparel for the motocross industry just would not be complete without protective goggles and eyewear. This is the forete of Fox Racing, Inc. Its innovative designs spell quality for all motocross enthusiasts all over the world. Because of the strong demand for Fox Racing sunglasses and goggles, more and more motor sports specialty retail stores have been distributing Fox eyewear worldwide. Oakley, Inc., of course, distributes these products as well.

Oliver Peoples – Oliver Peoples was actually co-founded by designer and optician Larry Leight way back 1986. In a short span of time, the brand has expanded its market to over 45 countries all over the world. In fact, 5 major retail stores are currently being operated by the brand in Tokyo, Costa Mesa, Los Angeles, and New York. New York actually has two retail stores in operation for Oliver Peoples. What's more, there are so many celebrities on the silver screen who wear Oliver Peoples® eyewear, making the brand all the more popular and prominent. Truly, with Oliver Peoples® eyewear, you enjoy the impressive mesh of both aesthetics from the olden days and finesse of the modern day.

You Must Listen Closely to Be a Better Car Salesman

When we talk about selling cars for a living we are talking about a competitive field where not all of the participants survive. It's a bit of a dog eat dog environment. The turnover at some car dealerships can be brisk and a couple very common questions among any sales staff is how can I be a better car salesman or how can I sell more cars.

The job of the automobile sales person is a multi-faceted job and in trying to answer the question of how to be a better car salesman there is not a single, all inclusive answer. Like most jobs there are a series of different tasks performed and in order to be successful one must work at and improve all of the different aspects of the job.

Listen to Be a Better Car Salesman

When it comes to being a car salesman one of the most important aspects of the job is being able to effectively communicate with people. There are not any tricks when it comes to dealing with people, but a critical part of dealing with a potential car buyer is to listen closely. Most people believe that in order to be a better car salesman that you need to be a good talker when in fact the truth is that you need to be a good listener.

I am not simply talking about the words that come out of their mouths. You see car buyers do not always tell every detail so to be a better car salesman you need to ask questions and listen closely. It has been said by many successful sales people that if you listen close enough the customer will tell you how to sell them a car.

If you want to be a better car salesman you need to listen to every word that comes from their mouth, but you also need to listen by watching their body language. The car buyer's body language consistors of facial expressions, body movements, attention span and attentiveness. When you present a vehicle to your customer and demonstrate some of the features and the customer is looking at the next feature while you are showing them the current feature the customer is telling you that you are moving too slow or that they are not very interested.

If you were listening closely by watching them and noting that they are not interested in that feature you would move on to something that interests them. However the sales person that was not paying very close attention would drone on about the feature and before too long their customer would become bored. This is a not an example of how to be a better car salesman, but how car buyers get turned off by sales people. That customer is very likely to get bored with the entire process and before long they would ask for the salesman's business card and tell them that they will be back when they have more time.

Then that customer would kindly visit another car dealer and if they are taken care of by a salesman that is listening closely and pays attention to their words and body language they will more than likely buy a car. This is a very common scenario when it comes to the business of selling cars and if you are determined to be a better car salesman you will start to pay attention to everything that your customer says and does and tailor your presentation accordingly.

A Brand New Recipe For Branding

In a recent article, I told the story of when I was a young whippersnapper, attaining classes at what was then and still is called "one of the more famous hotel schools in North America", the marketing professor gave us an interesting, but quite challenging assignment.

We were to find a hospitality business that marketed itself by using the participation of the owner as part of the "distinctiveness" of the business. At the time, this seemed like a most difficult assignment, because in those days, it seemed that not too many people really stood out in this field. At least that what it seemed like to me in my youth. Or maybe it was just that they did not want to either make a fool of themselves. There seemed little need to drive the world to their door. I chose a very different restaurant enclosed within an old 19th century Mansion in this very cosmopolitan city. It was called Julie's Mansion and was owned and operated by a very eccentric, but wonderful showman who knew that he had to differentiate his restaurant from all the rest. He knew that the best way to do that – after the assumption of great food, entertainment and service – was to turn himself into the "brand."

My job, as a young hospitality student, was to watch him carefully and learn as much as I could. One Saturday night I showed up and Julie was trying to 'insert' himself into the home team's pro hockey uniform. It was immediately obvious that Julie had never played hockey. To see a middle-aged man struggling to get into and then have to have me extricate him from the jersey, equipment, elbow pads et al, was hilarious for a young guy like me, who had been on skates and playing the game since age four. He certainly was not afraid to make a fool of himself. When I showed up that night, he had less than no idea what piece of equipment went where, and was struggling with the shin guards. He had got himself all tangled up with what he thought were hip guards, when in fact they were shoulder pads, worn over the shoulders. It was indeed the first time I had ever seen a 'player' wearing shoulder pads, stretched around his butt.

I helped him get 'dressed'. Next came the taping of the hockey stick. This was really hilarious, watching this fellow trying to figure out the right way to tape a hockey stick without making a mess of it and looking foolish to his customers. He had a special plan for that stick.

I taped his stick and now he was ready. He had on his uniform, equipment and helmet, borrowed from one of the local NHL players who were a frequent guest at the mansion. Now, he actually looked like a real NHL hockey player … in black and white running shoes, sans skates!

Then Julie 'flew through' the different alcoves and floors of the restaurant with a big ball of foodservice aluminum foil as his 'puck'. He stick-handled in and out and between tables, took shots with the aluminum ball off the walls, cross-checked his own waiters trying to serve tables, all the while yelling cheers and the phrase made famous' round the world, by Foster Hewitt : "he shoots …. he scores!" All this, at the top of his lungs. Then he had planned for a horn to sound loudly indicating that the 'period of play' in his imaginary 'game' was over. It was now time to go to the dressing room. In a flash, just like an on-stage magician, he quickly disappeared into thin air, hidden in his office.

My face was covered in tears. I could not stop laughing! The restaurant was in an uproar. Guests were laughing so hard … one guy literally fell off his chair. The waiters were laughing, the guests were laughing, I was laughing and all the while Julie was having a ball too. Here was a restaurateur who made his work fun.

I had not met one of these types before. I really liked and respected this fellow. But I figured then, and still today, that anyone who had that much fun … and made that much money … must know something the others did not. And he did. He became his own brand. 'Distinctive. 'Differentiated. 'There is attractive to people who are sick of seeing the same old, same old every day. People are attracted to differences not similarities. Take a look at what you can do with yours. It's right under your own nose.

© Copyright, Roy W. MacNaughton, 2006

Personal Budgeting: An Imperative

Budgeting is a basic part of accountancy.

Nations, states, cities, towns and every incorporated company have budgets. Every private company, or other commercial entity, worth its salt has a formal budget. So why is it that the vast majority of people do not use a formal budget in their private lives? They do budget of course. We all do in one way or another. But very, very few people have a good enough memory to successfully budget informally – that is, without writing it down. And it's when we forget to allow for some expense that we get into trouble. We get into debt. Is not that just about the worst feeling in the world – to be in unplanned debt?

To be poor is a sad experience – it's a state of mind. To be broke is an uncomfortable experience – but it's a temporary condition. To be in unplanned debt can be gut wrenching. And generally speaking, unplanned debt is just plain carelessness.

Why then does it happen? Simply because in the days before computers and calculators budgeting was a boring and time-consuming task. There was an awful lot of adding up to do and the darned thing had to be continuously adjusted as time went by, usually every month at least. So it was not surprising that most people just did not bother and as the generations passed by, so did the practice of ordinary people not preparing budgets for their personal finances. They just did not think that the value derived from maintaining a personal budget was worth the time consumed.

So what's changed? One very important factor: personal computers – they've just made it so easy that if you do not budget, you're making life unnecessarily difficult for yourself. It is now well and truly worth the very small investment of time to input a few lines of data every week. Because from that the computer can give you more financial reports than one person is ever likely to need. It will produce reports on tax payments; about what you've sent; about where you've spent it, about what you've spent it on and it will do that for any given period of your choosing. It'll find transactions that you've forgotten about but that suddenly you really need to know about. It will tell you how much money you will have in the bank next Christmas (or what you've got to stop spending money on so that you will have the amount of money you need in the bank next Christmas.)

The really big thing is that you will be in charge of your finances. It makes it so easy to explain to your dependents – be it spouse, partner or children; just exactly what the household can afford to spend, on what and when. Ninety-five percent of the arguments about money will go out the window because people will be able to see clearly what can and can not be done. If we buy you that cell phone, we will not be able to buy that game. You get the idea.

What software is best? Well there's no shortage of it. It's not expensive. The best is less than a hundred dollars and you'll save that in no time flat. Check out the choices available, and choose the one which best suits your personal needs. It will be well worth whatever you decide to invest in it. And it will most definitely save you lots of headaches and heartaches in the long run, if used properly.